Tech-In-Health(Part 3): Health Tech Innovators in Nigeria

health tech innovators

If there’s one thing that this pandemic has properly revealed, it is that our healthcare sector of the country has been lagging heavily and is in urgent need of attention. However, some Nigerian Youths have been giving some dose of attention to the sector.

TechSyrub has done some looking around and has found five leading health tech innovators in Nigeria! And in the third part of the Tech-In-Health series, we will introduce you briefly to these innovations and their respective founders.

Catch Part 1 here and Part 2 here

With each one getting more interesting than the next here are 5 Tech Innovators in Health and Their Founders:

In no particular order, the first on our list is Michael Osahon – Founder, Meditell.

If you are that person who never remembers to use your medications when due, then Meditell is for you.

Meditell is a robust, user-friendly platform which schedules reminders for patients and their caregivers, to ensure adherence to medication schedules. By using mobile phones. ‘Meditext’ and ‘Medicall’ set reminders for drug administration.

-Michael Osahon.

Straight out of NYSC, where he served as a secondary school teacher in Ijebu-Ode, Michael Osahon founded Meditell. He is a computer science graduate from Covenant University. Besides Meditell, Osahon has employed his product development skills to develop business applications for Stanbic IBTC Pension Managers and GTBank.

Among other things, he is a Senior Software Engineer with Ernst and Young.

 

Next on our list is Vivian Nwakah – Founder/CEO, Medsaf.

The problem was to ensure only authentic and quality medications are used in health facilities.

Medsaf aims to give hospitals, clinics, and pharmacies access to high-quality medication from manufacturers at affordable costs, thereby reducing incidences of complications arising from fake or substandard drugs administered to patients. It is supposed to serve as a one-stop-shop for safe medications in Africa, helping health facilities to buy authentic drugs with ease.

-Vivian Nwakah

CEO and founder of Medsaf, Vivian Nwakah, born and raised in the United States of America, though she schooled in other countries including Paris and China. She once recounted how she conceived the idea of Medsaf after losing her friend to fake medications during a 3-month internship in Nigeria.

“It was a moment of great sadness but I was also filled with shame. I was coming from the U.S and I had worked in healthcare agencies. There, it was about keeping elderly patients, even in their 80s and 90s alive with quality healthcare, but here, someone my age had died due to fake malaria pill,” she recalled.

Next Up is Olaniyi Ralph – Founder, GenRx

Olaniyi Ralph was still a 400 level pharmacy student at the Obafemi Awolowo University in 2014 when he had an epiphany. Having learned the devastating results of wrong drug combinations, interactions, and consumption of expired drugs, he designed an app, GenRx, which had the ability to detect and alert pharmacy owners about drugs nearing their expiration dates, drugs about to be sold in overdose, and wrong drug combinations.

This all-in-one software thus improves efficiency in sales processing and safety in dispensing medications. It also automatically calculates customers’ payments and balances, keeps daily records of items sold, salespersons on duty, and manages product reorders, ensuring that they do not run out of stock.

Over time, it has been improved to manage salaries and expenditures, and generate profit and loss statements of accounts. It now possesses an in-built calculator with three memory banks that can be used during on-going transactions. It can be configured to suit any pharmacy’s needs.

The Next Health Tech Innovator is Adeloye Olarenwaju – Founder SaferMom & BabyMigo

Adeloye has a Bachelor’s degree in Human physiology from the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology. He was observing the one-year compulsory national service in 2015 at the Ekiti State Primary Healthcare Board when he noticed a problem he had first seen during his internship.

“I realized mothers and babies weren’t getting the psychological, social, and mental support they needed. Nigeria presently contributes 13-15% of global maternal and child deaths yearly. Out of the 7.2 million birth rates recorded yearly (Unicef 2014 Estimate), we lose 260,000 newborns annually. Unfortunately, most cases are preventable when there’s increased access to basic health services,”

he later explained.

Safermom was developed as a mobile service for pregnant and nursing mothers of 0-3-year old babies, to access health information and make informed health decisions. This is achieved through voice calls, mobile SMS, helplines, and a mobile app. It also helps mothers track milestones in pregnancy and nursing, including vaccination dates, and shares prevention tips, and home remedies. Mothers can also dial a short code to access vital health information, government schemes, and important announcements in their local languages, and request tricycles or ambulances.

And Last on our list, in no particular order, Charles Onu – Founder, Ubenwa

If you were told that a baby’s cries could communicate as clearly as words, your first reaction might have been, “Impossible!” but not anymore.

Ubenwa, literally translated, means a baby’s cry in the Igbo language. It is an application that captures a baby’s cry, translates it, and makes a prognosis on what the problem could be. The result could be as simple as hunger, sleep, pain, or an early symptom of a life-long disability such as cerebral palsy, deafness, and paralysis. Even birth asphyxia, which is the third-highest cause of infant mortality, can be detected early enough to prevent any damage to the child’s brain or infant death.

Ultimately, the aim is to provide optimal care for babies and address early health challenges within the first two years of a child’s life. But how accurate can this be?

According to Onu, the Artificial Intelligence solution app has achieved over 95% prediction accuracy in trials with nearly 1,400 pre-recorded baby cries.

This innovation has won several awards, including the WHO Top 30 Africa Health Innovators in March 2019. 

Charles has a Bachelor’s degree in Electronic and Computer Engineering, and MSc and Ph.D. in Computer Science – Machine Learning from McGill University. He is a fellow of the Jeanne Sauvé Foundation 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *